Posts Tagged ‘purchase agreement’

Tales of a Home Buyer – part 3

May 20, 2011

Written by Shawn DeVries

Not long after, that call did come.  A friend of a family member was selling her parent’s home and was looking to her contacts first for potential buyers.  Fortunately, besides just looking online and in papers, I had told my family and friends that I was shopping for a house.  I also told them what I was looking for and to keep their eyes open for me.  When those big steps in life come up, it is important to enlist the help of those who know you best.

The sellers were selling the property by themselves without a realtor. (A For Sale By Owner.)  Had I not been employed by a lender I probably would not have considered this prospect.  I wondered how much experience they had in selling a home.  I wondered if they had any help lined up to handle this transaction. Yet, while I had some serious concerns I also figured that at this point I was only looking at the place.  So off I went. 

Remember that houses have personalities all their own?  This one was warm and inviting.  This place had character and charm.  This house could easily become my home.  I let them know I was interested but left myself an out.  With spring break coming I would be out of town.  So we made arrangements to talk again after my vacation and that if any other offers came in they would call me to see if I really wanted the place.

During my vacation I could not get that house out of my mind.  By the time my short hiatus was done, I had the place re-carpeted with new laminate flooring, fresh paint and my furniture all neatly placed inside.  This was all in my head of course, but I was hooked.  Again we set an appointment to meet and I made them an offer.  While they remained cool and asked for time to deliberate I was given a good feeling when I left. 

They called first thing the next morning to ask where to fax the signed agreement.  I was screaming with excitement!  I had found a house.  (I was actually screaming inside since I was at work, but I was still really, really excited.)  Now the real work began.

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Tales of a Home Buyer – part 2

May 17, 2011

Written by Shawn DeVries

From all I have read and been told this was my market.  Houses are in large supply, foreclosures are around every corner, prices have come way down; I would have a huge selection to choose from.  Or so I thought.  While there were plenty of homes on the market, not all of them fit my criteria or needs. 

Now let me stop just a moment and say that there is a significant difference between needs and wants when buying a home.  I may want something from the pages of Better Homes & Gardens, but I need a roof over my head that won’t fall over at the slightest breeze.  I may want a master suite with garden tub and walk-in closet, but what I need are three bedrooms and toilet that won’t leak.  You understand.  Dream about that perfect house and go for it, but make sure your dreams align with reality.

Ok, so off I went to start shopping, real shopping.  Up until now I had been just window shopping – looking on line, driving through neighborhoods, leafing through the newspaper.  Now was my time to go inside the houses and really take a good look.  I was crushed!  I was looking at mostly foreclosure homes and expected some dirt and debris in these vacant places.  What I found was absolute filth, half-completed and poorly constructed projects, and plain shock as I wondered how anyone could live this way.  Didn’t their mother ever show them a broom?!  What were these banks thinking in even listing a house in this condition?  These were not just small projects to make a house my home.  I was looking at major repairs perfect for the HGTV shows like “Over Your Head” and “DIY Disasters” where some poor home owner has bitten off way more than they could chew.  Uuugh!

However I was determined.  (Remember I am living with my parents so being a motivated buyer doesn’t even come close to describing my drive to get this accomplished.)  As I looked, I started to expand my criteria; and searching online makes this process very simple to do.   In adding condos to my list of options, I soon found one that seemed to fit.  I made an appointment to see the property and fell in love.  While I would need to make some slight modifications, it would work for me.  Best of all, I could actually picture myself in the place. 

It sounds a little odd to say, but houses (and condos) really do have personalities.  When you walk into a place for the first time there’s a certain feeling that you receive.  Some places feel cold and sterile, others warm and inviting.  There are properties that exude formality and structure, and others that say this place knows how to throw a good party.  This condo seemed to work for me.  So I wrote an offer. 

My offer was admittedly low.  However, being in the industry I knew about some limitations some lenders have on properties being flipped as this one was.  So I made my offer supported with documentation and waited to see what would happen.  The wait, while only a few hours, was excruciating.  What are they thinking?  Do they understand my offer?  Can they see that I am a good buyer?  Why would they not accept my offer?  Are there other offers being considered? 

The answer came back swiftly with a simple, “pass”.  The response felt like a sucker punch to the gut.  But why?!  This makes perfect sense to me.  What’s your problem anyway Bub?!  Regardless of my feelings, this place was not the one I would eventually call home.  So my search continued.

I found another condo in the development that offered a bit more of what I wanted on my wish list, and another offer was made.  This offer felt different.  I was more guarded to the response.  I was hopeful, but prepared for a “no”.  I liked this place too, but was not nearly so in love with it.  Maybe I was preparing myself for rejection yet again.  Maybe I was starting to get desperate.  I hoped not.  The offer came back.  Again it was declined, but at least this rejection offered a rationale.  Another offer had been submitted earlier in the day and the seller had already accepted that offer.

At this point, I was beginning to doubt of whether my dream of home ownership would ever come true.  Where was the place I would call home?  Whoever had it, needed to call me…soon.

Too Much of a Good Thing?

March 18, 2010

Last month we posted an article on RD (Rural Development) home loans.  We outlined the basics and how this is a great option to consider when purchasing a home, especially when so many areas and buyers may qualify.  Unfortunately, this program may come to a sudden halt – at least for the rest of this fiscal year.

Early last week a memo from the US Department of Agriculture Rural Development alerted lenders that they anticipated funding for this year’s program to be exhausted by the end of April, 2010.  This news itself is nothing earth shattering, but the timing most certainly is.  Normally funds start to become depleted in the fall near the end of USDA’s fiscal year which ends September 30th. 

The other challenge is that there will not be any Conditional Commitments.  Typically as funds are depleted, loans are conditionally approved pending more fund allocation.  Once the department has the new fiscal year’s budget approved with new government funding those loans are fully approved and business continues as usual.  Not this year.  Since there is such a huge gap between now and the start of the next fiscal year, Conditional Commitments are just not appropriate.

So what caused this problem?  Why did the funding end so quickly?  The easiest explanation is the growing popularity of the program.  Kevin Smith, Area Director for Rural Development says, “Record demand, not only in Michigan but nationally, for the Guaranteed Rural Housing loan program will led to the full utilization of Congressionally appropriated funding at an early time frame this fiscal year.”

We too have seen a steady increase in RD loans; and our company continues to underwrite more RD loans than any other lender in the state of Michigan.  As more borrowers learn about the program with low income requirements, 100% financing options, and the vast amount of area classified as rural; demand will continue to increase. 

The next obvious question is what can be done to ease this challenge in the future?  Should more money be allocated to the program?  Should the upfront funding fee be increased like the FHA program has done?  Should this be a top subject for Congress to focus on?  Smith could not comment on policy issues of the federal government, but one thing is sure.  If you want to take advantage of this program yet this fiscal year, you need to have a signed purchase agreement as soon as possible.  There are only 6 weeks left before committed funds are anticipated to be exhausted.  Miss this window, and you may need to wait until October to get in on this program again.

Things could always change based on how the federal government reacts.  Time will tell.  In the meantime, we’ll keep watching and will let you know how this program progresses.

What’s the Difference? (Part 3)

January 8, 2010

(Part 3 of 3 posts on terminology that can often create confusion)

What’s the difference between an “inspection” and an “appraisal”?

These terms can often get confused because they happen relatively close together in the loan process and because, at first glance, they seem to cover the same thing.  Obviously they are different (or this wouldn’t have been a topic of a blog) in what the purpose of each one is and even in when each is used.

An inspection is used for a home purchase and usually takes place shortly after the purchase agreement has been signed.  The intent is to allow the buyer to closely ‘inspect’ all areas of the home for quality and/or potential problems.  In many cases your purchase offer can be dependant upon your satisfaction with the results of the inspection.  Therefore, an inspection is usually required to happen within 7-10 days of the purchase offer being accepted by the seller.

A state licensed inspector will carefully review all areas of your home including the plumbing, electrical and heating/cooling systems; roof, windows and foundation; drainage of the property; and even potential pest problems.    Even though you will be issued a complete written report of the findings, it is a good idea to tag along and learn the in and outs of your new home.  While not required, home inspections are now strongly recommended.  (A side note here.  Despite inspections not being mandatory, make sure that any inspector you do use is actually licensed by the state.  Oddly enough, not all of them are.)

An appraisal is a review of your home that analyzes the value of your home and property compared to surrounding homes of similar size and style that have sold in the past 6 months.  The end result is a dollar value used to determine your maximum home loan amount.  Appraisals are now completed on all home loan transactions including refinance loans.

So in review, an inspection critiques the quality and safety of your home; an appraisal judges the value of your home compared to those in the neighborhood.

Hopefully you found all three of these posts helpful to you.  In case you missed one, here they are again:

Part 1 – What’s the difference between a pre-qualification and a pre-approval?

Part 2 – What’s the difference between a closing cost and a prepaid expense?

If you have specific questions relating to home loans, the mortgage industry or maybe just a thought, leave us a comment.  We’d love to hear from you.